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Nov
26

michael-jordan1

Olympic Gold Medal: 1984, 1992

NBA Champion: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998

NCAA National Championship: 1982

NBA MVP: 1987/88, 1990/91, 1991/92, 1995/96, 1997/98

NBA Finals MVP: 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98

NBA Leading Scorer: 1986/87, 1987/88, 1988/89, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98

All-NBA First Team: 1986/87, 1987/88, 1988/89, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98

All-NBA Second Team: 1984/85

NBA All-Star Game: 1984/85, 1985/86, 1986/87, 1987/88, 1988/89, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98, 2001/02, 2002/03

NBA All-Star Game MVP: 1987/88, 1995/96, 1997/98

NBA All-Defensive Team: 1987/88, 1988/89, 1989/90, 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98

NBA Defensive Player of the Year: 1987/88

NBA Rookie of the Year: 1984/85

NBA All-Rookie Team: 1984/85

Third on NBA All Time Scoring List: (32,292 points)

Second Most Steals of All Time: (2,514 steals)

50 Greatest Players in NBA History: 1996

The Sporting News MVP: 1987/88, 1988/89, 1990/91, 1991/92, 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98

NBA Slam Dunk Contest winner: 1987, 1988

ACC Freshman of the Year: 1982

ACC Men’s Basketball Player of the Year: 1984

USBWA College Player of the Year: 1984

Naismith College Player of the Year: 1984

John R. Wooden Award: 1984

Adolph Rupp Trophy: 1984

Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year: 1991

ESPN North American Athlete of the Century: 1999

ESPY Athlete of the Century: 2000

ESPY Male Athlete of the Decade Award: 1990s

ESPY Pro Basketballer of the Decade Award: 1990s

Associated Press Athlete of the Century (Second Place): 1999

Sport Greatest Athlete of the Last 50 years: 1996

Ranked #1 by SLAM Magazine’s Top 75 Players of All-Time

Ranked #1 by ESPN Sportscentury’s Top 100 Athletes of the 20th century

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Nov
26

michael-jordan-slam-dunk-88-posterJordan’s individual accolades and accomplishments include five MVP awards, ten All-NBA First Team designations, nine All-Defensive First Team honors, fourteen NBA All-Star Game appearances and three All-Star MVP, ten scoring titles, three steals titles, six NBA Finals MVP awards, and the 1988 NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award. He holds the NBA record for highest career regular season scoring average with 30.12 points per game, as well as averaging a record 33.4 points per game in the playoffs. In 1999, he was named the greatest North American athlete of the 20th century by ESPN, and was second to Babe Ruth on the Associated Press’s list of athletes of the century. He will be eligible for induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2009.

Nov
26

michael-jordan-north-carolina-collegeJordan was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Deloris (née Peoples), who worked in banking, James R. Jordan, Sr., an equipment supervisor. His family moved to Wilmington, North Carolina, when he was a toddler. Jordan attended Emsley A. Laney High School in Wilmington, where he anchored his athletic career by playing baseball, football, and basketball. He tried out for the varsity basketball team during his sophomore year, but at 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m), he was deemed too short to play at that level and was cut from the team. The following summer, however, he grew four inches (10 cm) and trained rigorously. Upon earning a spot on the varsity roster, Jordan averaged about 25 points per game over his final two seasons of high school play. As a senior, he was selected to the McDonald’s All-American Team after averaging a triple-double: 29.2 points, 11.6 rebounds, and 10.1 assists.

In 1981, Jordan earned a basketball scholarship to the University of North Carolina, where he majored in cultural geography. As a freshman in coach Dean Smith’s team-oriented system, he was named ACC Freshman of the Year after he averaged 13.4 points per game (ppg) on 53.4% shooting (field goal percentage). He made the game-winning jump shot in the 1982 NCAA Championship game against Georgetown, which was led by future NBA rival Patrick Ewing. Jordan later described this shot as the major turning point in his basketball career. During his three seasons at North Carolina, he averaged 17.7 ppg on 54.0% shooting, and added 5.0 rebounds per game (rpg). After winning the Naismith and the Wooden College Player of the Year awards in 1984, Jordan left North Carolina one year before his scheduled graduation to enter the 1984 NBA Draft. The Chicago Bulls selected Jordan with the third overall pick, after Hakeem Olajuwon (Houston Rockets) and Sam Bowie (Portland Trail Blazers). Jordan returned to North Carolina to complete his degree in 1986.

Nov
26

basketball_quotes_michael_jordan1Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player and active businessman. His biography on the National Basketball Association (NBA) website states, “By acclamation, Michael Jordan is the greatest basketball player of all time.”[1] Jordan was one of the most effectively marketed athletes of his generation, and was instrumental in popularizing the NBA around the world in the 1980s and 1990s.

After a stand-out career at the University of North Carolina, Jordan joined the NBA’s Chicago Bulls in 1984. He quickly emerged as one of the stars of the league, entertaining crowds with his prolific scoring. His leaping ability, illustrated by performing slam dunks from the free throw line at Slam Dunk Contests, earned him the nicknames “Air Jordan” and “His Airness.” He also gained a reputation as one of the best defensive players in basketball. In 1991, he won his first NBA championship with the Bulls, and followed that achievement with titles in 1992 and 1993, securing a “three-peat.” Though Jordan abruptly left the NBA at the beginning of the 1993-94 NBA season to pursue a career in baseball, he rejoined the Bulls in 1995 and led them to three additional championships (1996, 1997, and 1998) as well as an NBA-record 72 regular-season wins in the 1995–96 season. Jordan retired for a second time in 1999, but he returned for two more NBA seasons in 2001 as a member of the Washington Wizards.